Bhutan

GENPA LEKSO – A WARM WELCOME TO GANGTEY LODGE

As the white scarf, or “KHADAR,” that is presented to you upon arrival, symbolizes respect, care and good wishes, our Lodge family invites you to our home, Gangtey Lodge. Roam the halls, nap next to the fire, or ask us to take you on a short journey through the mystical hills and forested areas surrounding the Lodge.
Our service philosophy is unobtrusive and personalized. We aim to spoil you, not as a guest, but rather as one of our family members. Allow us to satisfy your needs and curiosity, as your very presence here, satisfies ours.

Our youthful Bhutanese team is eager to share their life experiences and culture with you. Growing up in the “Land of the Thunder Dragon” their beliefs are endless and their answers are always genuine.

 

The ancient Kingdom of Bhutan to this day remains one of the world’s most mysterious and undiscovered destinations.

The ancient Kingdom of Bhutan is known to the Bhutanese as ‘Druk Yul’, translated as ‘Land of the Thunder Dragon’. It is a country where spirits and myths are an accepted part of daily life and where the Gross National Happiness of it’s people is used as an official measure of development by the government.

Bhutan opened it’s borders to tourists in 1974, when the Government realised the opportunity to raise revenue and promote the country’s unique culture and traditions to the outside world.

Despite now being open, a close watch is kept on the impact that tourists are having on Bhutan’s unique ecosystem – its virtually unspoiled landscape and culture. For this reason, tourism still has some restrictions unlike many other destinations in the world.

Therefore all tourists (groups or individuals) must travel on a planned, prepaid, guided package tour or custom designed travel program. Most foreigners cannot travel independently in the Kingdom. All arrangements must be made through an officially approved tour operator, either directly or through an overseas agent, including all guests to Gangtey Lodge Bhutan. For more information regarding this process, please contact us HERE.

 

Our Valley

The Phobjikha (Gangtey) Valley is one of the most beautiful spots in Bhutan where dense forests are augmented by an impression of vast space.
A few kilometers beyond the Gangtey Monastery on the valley floor lies the village of Phobjikha. This place is the winter home of Black-necked cranes that migrate from the arid plains of Tibet in the north to pass winter in a milder climate. Phobjikha, at an altitude of 2900 m, falls under the district of Wangduephodrang and lies on the periphery of the Black Mountain National Park. The valley boasts two beautiful meandering rivers, Nakay Chhu (Chhu Naap-black water) and Gay Chhu (Chhu Karp-white water).

 

The best time to travel to Bhutan:

Each season brings with it a unique and beautiful experience. Here is a guide of what to expect year-round:

March – May, September – November

The weather is ideal in spring and autumn. Temperatures range from 20 – 25 degrees centigrade during the day and drop to around 10 degrees at night. Book flights and accommodation well in advance for this period as travel numbers are limited. Himalayan views are best from October through to December, while rhododendrons are in full bloom in March and April.

December – February

Bhutan has seasonal tariffs so there will be fewer tourists travelling outside the main season. The weather is very pleasant, though it can be a little cold for some people in December and January. Average temperatures range from 14-16 degrees centigrade during the day, and 0 to -5 degrees at night time. For Phobjikha Valley this is a beautiful time to visit as the Black-necked Cranes are a unique attraction during this time.

June – August

This period is warmer and traditionally Bhutan’s rainy season. However, in recent times this period has become much drier, and even though you will likely experience a heavy downpour at times, it rarely dampens your experience in Phobjikha Valley. We can easily arrange your itinerary around the forecast. During this period, high-altitude flowers are at their peak and the valleys are lush and green.

According to a local legend, the two rivers actually represent a snake and a boar. The two animals once raced each other for a bountiful prize.

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